Home Consumer ‘Zero-Waste’ Loop Delivers Coke And Häagen-Dazs In Reusable Packaging (Video)

‘Zero-Waste’ Loop Delivers Coke And Häagen-Dazs In Reusable Packaging (Video)

reusable
Farmer T. U. English and hired man, on horse-drawn milk wagon, Lake Odessa, Michigan, c. 1910. (Wystan/(CC BY-SA 2.0))

Next time when I scream, you scream and we all scream for ice cream we could also be helping our planet. Buzz60’s Maria Mercedes Galuppo has more.

A lineup of the world’s biggest consumer brands are joining a zero-waste online shopping project that delivers items in refillable and reusable containers. Loop — announced at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland last week — is an online shopping platform that wants to save customers the hassle of recycling by adopting the age-old model of the milkman.

Loop is now set to add 300 items to its site — including Tide detergent, Häagen-Dazs ice cream, Axe deodorant, Coca-Cola and Pampers diapers — under a new pilot scheme with backing from the likes of Procter & Gamble (which owns a 2 percent stake in the platform), Unilever, Nestlé, PepsiCo, and Danone. Together they’re hoping to rid the world of the scourge of single-use plastics (the type clogging up landfills and our oceans). The service will roll out to several thousand consumers in New York and Paris this May, according to CNN, with plans to expand to London later in 2019 and Toronto, Tokyo and San Francisco in 2020.

At first glance, Loop’s ordering system looks like any other: customers create an account, add items to an online basket (with the service promising prices comparable to a nearby store), and checkout. But there’s a twist. On top of the regular cost of the item, customers must put down a fully refundable deposit for each package, ranging from 25 cents for a bottle of Coca-Cola to $47 for a Pampers diaper bin.

Engadget, excerpt posted on SouthFloridaReporter.com, Jan. 29, 2019

Video by Buzz60/Maria Mercedes Galuppo

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