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Today Is Stamp Out Hunger Food Drive, In South Florida Over 400,000 Go To Bed Hungry Daily

food drive

The second Saturday in May is the largest one-day food drive in the nation.  So it is appropriately named Stamp Out Hunger Food Drive Day. How is it possible? It occurs in more than 10,000 cities and towns, and the food is collected by those men and women carrying our mail across the country.

Feeding South Florida® Reveals Estimated 138.4 Million Meals Shortfall Per Year in South Florida Through Map the Meal Gap 2016 Analysis of Food Insecurity in the US

food drive Feeding South Florida to Host “Get the Facts: County Level Hunger Data” Listening Sessions in June to Discuss Updated Numbers and Share Release of Study’s County-Level Findings.

The updated Map the Meal Gap study recently released by Feeding South Florida® and Feeding America® reveals new findings in the mission to end hunger in South Florida. The study provides statistics about the population of those struggling with food insecurity, or not knowing from where they will receive their next meal, throughout Palm Beach, Broward, Miami-Dade and Monroe Counties.

Faith Based Events

Map the Meal Gap 2016 is a detailed landmark analysis of food insecurity for every county and congressional district in the United States, and the only study that provides local-level estimates of food insecurity across the country. The study features a user-friendly design and infographics, as well as an interactive map with a responsive design that is mobile and tablet friendly.

food drive A summary of the 2016 Map the Meal Gap findings is available at www.feedingamerica.org/mapthegap.

In addition to Map the Meal Gap, Feeding South Florida, in conjunction with Feeding America, participated in the quadrennial Hunger in America 2014 study, which looks at clients accessing Feeding America food banks and food access. The overall South Florida findings from the HIA study are published at http://feedingsouthflorida.org/.

Feeding South Florida will host “Get the Hunger Facts: County Level Hunger Data” listening sessions during the month of June, to discuss the state of hunger in South Florida (Map the Meal Gap and Hunger in America), review Feeding South Florida’s five-year strategic plan, the current state of hunger in South Florida, and discuss next steps for ending it. In addition, Feeding South Florida will release its Child Hunger Corps Community Needs Assessment, supported by ConAgra and Feeding America, which includes findings on the status of food programs for children as well as Feeding South Florida’s recommendations. Listening sessions will be held in each county Feeding South Florida serves. Stay tuned for more details.

food drive The Map the Meal Gap study reports a food budget shortfall of 138,400,000 meals, or $19.10 per person per week (a total shortfall of $454 million per year) in South Florida. These are meals missing from the tables of the 784,110 people (13.4 percent of the South Florida population) at risk of hunger in South Florida. Most striking about these statistics is that 21.5 percent of children in South Florida are food insecure, meaning 264,280 children go to bed hungry. The increase in food costs per meal is the highest jump in the past four years, with a more than 15 cent increase per meal.

The study revealed that out of the counties Feeding South Florida serves, Palm Beach County has the highest percentage of food insecure children, Broward County has the highest percentage of food insecure individuals, and Miami-Dade continues to steadily decrease its food insecure population.

An analysis of the study reveals that although less people struggle with food insecurity, the cost of a meal has increased. This reflects a larger trend: The cost of living is increasing, and those who struggle to put food on the table have larger bills to pay and less money to go towards nutritious food. While the population in Feeding South Florida’s quad-county service area has increased, those in need of food assistance has decreased. While this shows emergency food assistance and government benefits programs work, it also shows that those in need are more so than before.

With the updated study, Feeding America, in collaboration with the Howard G. Buffett Foundation and The Nielsen Company, takes a look at “meals” in a whole new way. It uses county-level data on food costs from The Nielsen Company to break down the food budget shortfall of South Florida residents into an approximation of the meals missing from the tables of people at risk of hunger in South Florida each year. The study provides an updated look at:

  1. Food insecurity rates by county and Congressional District.
  2. Percent of food insecure population likely eligible for federal nutrition programs by county and Congressional District.
  3. Number of food insecure people by county and Congressional District.
  4. Food cost variation for every county across the nation.

Statistics revealed for counties served by Feeding South Florida (Palm Beach, Broward, Miami-Dade and Monroe) include:

83 percent of the food insecure population in South Florida qualify based on income for SNAP (foods stamps) and other federal nutrition programs, while 17 percent do NOT qualify for federal nutrition programs, and often must rely on emergency food assistance programs and need better wages and employment opportunities to help them meet their basic needs.

  • $3.28 is the average cost of a meal in South Florida.
  • Palm Beach County has the highest percentage of food insecure children in South Florida (22.5 percent).
  • Broward County has the highest percentage of food insecure individuals in South Florida (15.5 percent).
  • Miami-Dade County has the lowest percentage of food insecure individuals and children in South Florida (11.3 percent).
  • Monroe County has the highest food cost index in South Florida at $3.84 per meal, and the highest weekly budget shortfall per food at $22.33.

Statistics broken down by county:

food drive Palm Beach County

  • 14.7 percent of the Palm Beach County population is food insecure, with 199,460 people not knowing from where they will get their next meal.
  • 71 percent of the food insecure population in Palm Beach County qualify based on income for SNAP (food stamps) and other federal nutrition programs, while 29 percent do not and often must rely on emergency food assistance programs and need better wages and employment opportunities to help them meet their basic needs.
  • $3.34 is the average price per meal in Palm Beach County.
  • The food budget shortfall in Palm Beach County per person per week is $19.42, with a total shortfall of $117,489,000 or 35,213,000 meals.
  • 22.5 percent of children in Palm Beach County are food insecure, meaning 60,340 children go to bed hungry.

food drive Broward County

  • 15.5 percent of the Broward County population is food insecure, with 281,940 people not knowing from where they will get their next meal.
  • 74 percent of the food insecure population in Broward County qualify based on income for SNAP (food stamps) and other federal nutrition programs, while 26 percent do not and often must rely on emergency food assistance programs and need better wages and employment opportunities to help them meet their basic needs.
  • $3.27 is the average price per meal in Broward County.
  • The food budget shortfall in Broward County per person per week is $19.04, with a total shortfall of $162,796,000 or 49,774,300 meals.
  • 20.6 percent of children in Broward County are food insecure, meaning 81,710 children go to bed hungry.   

food drive Miami-Dade County

  • 11.3 percent of the Miami-Dade County population is food insecure, with 293,070 people not knowing from where they will get their next meal.
  • 100 percent of the food insecure population in Miami-Dade County qualify based on income for SNAP (Foods Stamps) and other federal nutrition programs, while 0 percent do not and often must rely on emergency food assistance programs and need better wages and employment opportunities to help them meet their basic needs.
  • $3.33 is the average price per meal in Miami-Dade County.
  • The food budget shortfall in Miami-Dade County per person per week is $19.38, with a total shortfall of $172,267,000 or 51,739,200 meals.
  • 21.8 percent of children in Miami-Dade County are food insecure, meaning 119,750 children go to bed hungry.

food drive Monroe County

  • 12.8 percent of the Monroe County population is food insecure, with 9,640 people not knowing from where they will get their next meal.
  • 70 percent of the food insecure population in Monroe County qualify based on income for SNAP (food stamps) and other federal nutrition programs, while 30 percent do not and often must rely on emergency food assistance programs and need better wages and employment opportunities to help them meet their basic needs.
  • $3.84 is the average price per meal in Monroe County.
  • The food budget shortfall in Monroe County per person per week is $22.33, with a total shortfall of $6,530,000 or 1,701,900 meals.
  • 21.8 percent of children in Monroe County are food insecure, meaning 2,480 children go to bed hungry.

“Although the overall number of food insecure individuals has decreased in South Florida, the average cost of a meal in South Florida has increased, meaning most of the families and households we serve must make the difficult choice between paying for food and paying for housing, utilities or much-needed medication. Our friends and neighbors should not have to choose,” said Paco Vélez, president & CEO of Feeding South Florida.

Feeding America first published the Map the Meal Gap project in early 2011, with the generous support of the Howard G. Buffett Foundation and The Nielsen Company, to learn more about the face of hunger at the local level. In August 2011, with the support of the ConAgra Foods Foundation, child food insecurity data was added to the project.

As one of 199 food banks in the Feeding America network, Feeding South Florida is a leader in hunger-related research and held to high standards of food safety, civil rights, and stewardship while carrying out its mission to end hunger in South Florida. In addition to leading research efforts, regular and routine audits from Feeding America, AIB, USDA, DOH and DOT distinguish Feeding South Florida from food banks that are not affiliated with Feeding America. The largest food bank in Florida, serving 30 percent of the state’s food insecure population, Feeding South Florida continues to increase the amount of food it distributes by at least 10 percent each year. In fiscal year 2011–2012, it distributed 29.6 million pounds; in fiscal year 2012–2013, it distributed 34 million pounds; in fiscal year 2013–2014, it distributed 37 million pounds; in fiscal year 2014–2015, it distributed 39 million pounds. Feeding South Florida anticipates it will rescue more than 45 million pounds of food this fiscal year.

About Feeding South Florida®

Feeding South Florida’s mission is to end hunger in South Florida by providing immediate access to nutritious food, leading hunger and poverty advocacy efforts, and transforming lives through innovative programming and education. Feeding South Florida® is the sole Feeding America® food bank in South Florida, and the leading domestic hunger-relief organization in the region, serving 25 percent of the state’s food insecure population. Through a local network of approximately 360 nonprofit partner agencies, Feeding South Florida distributes almost 40 million pounds of food annually, serving 784,110 individuals in need of food assistance, 264,280 of whom are children, and 150,000 are older adults, throughout Palm Beach, Broward, Miami-Dade and Monroe Counties. For more information, visit www.feedingsouthflorida.org or call 954.518.1818. 

About Feeding America®

Feeding America is the nationwide network of 199 food banks that leads the fight against hunger in the United States. Together, we provide food to more than 46 million people through 60,000 food pantries and meal programs in communities across America. Feeding America also supports programs that improve food security among the people we serve; educates the public about the problem of hunger; and advocates for legislation that protects people from going hungry. Individuals, charities, businesses and government all have a role in ending hunger. Donate. Volunteer. Advocate. Educate. Together we can solve hunger. Visit www.feedingamerica.org, find us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.