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Tropical Downpours, Flooding Possible; Watching The Busy Tropics

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Downpours

DownpoursSouth Florida will see some tropical downpours on Thursday as we continue to watch the tropics. A weak wave and upper level low are combining to bring plenty of moisture, so look for a cloudy Thursday with periods of heavy rain as showers and storms move through. Watch out for localized flooding in the wake of those downpours. A moderate risk of dangerous rip currents is in place at the Atlantic beaches on Thursday. Thursday’s highs will be near 90 degrees. Some showers and storms will be around during the evening and overnight.

DownpoursFriday will see some lingering showers, followed by some sun as slightly drier air moves in. Highs on Friday will be in the low 90s. The stronger wave we’ve been watching should stay east of the Bahamas and have a minimal impact on our weather this weekend and beyond.

Saturday will feature a few early showers, a mix of sun and clouds, and a few afternoon storms forming along the sea breeze. Highs on Saturday will be in the low 90s.

Sunday’s forecast includes a few early coastal showers, sun and clouds, and a few afternoon storms. Sunday’s highs will be in the low 90s.

Monday will kick off the workweek with a few early showers, sun and clouds, and some afternoon storms, especially inland. Monday’s highs will be in the low 90s.

DownpoursThe tropics are busy. The National Hurricane Center is now giving the weak wave/upper level low in our vicinity a low chance of developing. But the real concern will be the possibility of heavy downpours causing street flooding in vulnerable areas on Thursday. We’ve been watching the wave in the Atlantic, and it continues to have a medium chance of development. But computer models are more in agreement that it will remain well to our east.

Our named storm, Tropical Storm Franklin, has made a second landfall in Mexico. At 5 am Thursday, Franklin was located near 17.9 North, 97.6 West, and was moving west at 15 miles per hour. Maximum sustained winds were 70 miles per hour. Franklin will weaken quickly over the mountainous terrain, but it poses the threat of life-threatening flooding and mudslides.

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Copyright 2017 South Florida Reporter
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Donna Thomas has studied hurricanes for two decades. She holds a PhD in history when her experience with Hurricane Andrew ultimately led her to earn a degree in broadcast meteorology from Mississippi State University. Donna spent 15 years at WFOR-TV (CBS4 in Miami-Fort Lauderdale), where she worked as a weather producer with hurricane experts Bryan Norcross and David Bernard. She also produced hurricane specials and weather-related features and news coverage, as well as serving as pool TV producer at the National Hurricane Center during the 2004 and 2005 seasons. Donna also served as a researcher on NOAA's Atlantic Hurricane Database Reanalysis Project. Donna specializes in Florida's hurricane history.