Home History.com Does This Photo Show Amelia Earhart After Her Plane Disappeared? (Video)

Does This Photo Show Amelia Earhart After Her Plane Disappeared? (Video)

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Earhart
A formerly unknown photograph possibly depicting famed aviator Amelia Earhart, her navigator Fred Noonan and their ill-fated plane. The photo was found in the National Archives by former Federal Agent Les Kinney. (History.com)

Buried in the National Archives for nearly 80 years, a newly rediscovered photo may hold the key to solving one of history’s all-time greatest mysteries.

On July 2, 1937, near the end of her pioneering flight around the world, Amelia Earhart vanished somewhere over the Pacific Ocean. Most experts, including the Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum, believe Earhart likely ran out of fuel and crashed into the Pacific Ocean. But no trace of the aviator, navigator Fred Noonan or her twin-engine Lockheed Electra airplane were ever found, confounding historians and fueling conspiracy theories ever since. Now, new evidence has surfaced in U.S. government archives suggesting Earhart might not have crashed into the Pacific at all, but crash-landed in the Marshall Islands, was captured by the Japanese military and died while being held prisoner on the island of Saipan.

According to HISTORY’s upcoming investigative special “Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence,” airing Sunday, July 9, retired federal agent Les Kinney scoured the National Archives for records that may have been overlooked in the search for the lost aviator. Among thousands of documents he uncovered was a photograph stamped with official Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) markings reading “Marshall Islands, Jaluit Atoll, Jaluit Island, Jaluit Harbor.” In the photo, a ship can be seen towing a barge with an airplane on the back; on a nearby dock are several people.

 


History,  excerpt posted on SouthFloridaReporter.com, July 6, 2017

Video from Inside Edition via Inform.com

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